EasyJet reroutes Thessaloniki flights due to runway works

EasyJet reroutes Thessaloniki flights due to runway works

THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) – Budget airline easyJet says runway maintenance work at the airport in Greece’s second city of Thessaloniki is forcing it to reroute passengers through alternative airports until Dec. 21 at least.

An easyJet statement says Thessaloniki flights will be operated through Athens airport until Dec. 6, and Kavala airport from Dec. 7-21. Bus links will be provided for Thessaloniki passengers.

Thessaloniki airport’s main runway is undergoing maintenance work, handled by the Greek government, through March 2018. The airline said Friday Thessaloniki’s temporary runway poses risks “not acceptable” to easyJet.

Thessaloniki officials say the runway works will harm key tourism revenues. Deputy Mayor Spyros Pengas told The Associated Press that the disruption will damage the city’s reputation with travelers, and voiced hopes the works will finish on time.

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DOJ considering federal charges against illegal immigrant acquitted in Kate Steinle case

DOJ considering federal charges against illegal immigrant acquitted in Kate Steinle case

A Department of Justice official said Friday the agency is considering federal charges against Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, who was acquitted of the murder of Kate Steinle.

“We are looking at every option, and we will prosecute this to the fullest extent available under the law because these cases are tragic and entirely preventable,” Sarah Isgur Flores, DOJ spokeswoman, said on Fox News.

Ms. Flores said the charges could be felony re-entry among several other possible cases they could bring forward.

On Thursday, a California jury acquitted the illegal immigrant who killed Ms. Steinle while on a walk with her father on the San Francisco pier in 2015.

Garcia Zarate, 54, had admitted to fatally shooting Ms. Steinle but said it was an accident. He was found guilty of lesser gun charges in the case. He is an illegal immigrant who had a criminal history and had already been deported five times, but was protected from another deportation by San Francisco’s sanctuary policy.

Ms. Flores said DOJ would urge sanctuary cities, those restricting cooperation with federal immigration authorities, to “reconsider” that decision.

“This is a person that never should have been on that pier, and Kate Steinle would still be alive,” she said.

President Trump made the case a top issue of his presidential campaign leading in part to, arguably his most famous campaign promise, to build wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

He tweeted his anger at the verdict on Friday morning and renewed his calls for a border wall.

“The Kate Steinle killer came back and back over the weakly protected Obama border, always committing crimes and being violent, and yet this info was not used in court. His exoneration is a complete travesty of justice. BUILD THE WALL!” Mr. Trump tweeted.

Stephen Dinan contributed to this report.

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Colleges review honors amid sexual misconduct allegations

Colleges review honors amid sexual misconduct allegations

The wave of sexual allegations from Hollywood to Washington has left many U.S. colleges weighing whether to revoke honorary degrees and other accolades awarded to prominent men accused of misconduct.

Dozens of schools have bestowed honors upon men who now face accusations ranging from sexual harassment to assault. Fired news anchor Charlie Rose has at least nine honorary degrees, for example, and Pixar executive John Lasseter has two.

Some schools have already started cutting ties, including the University at Buffalo, which rescinded a 2001 honorary degree awarded to film mogul and alumnus Harvey Weinstein. The University of Kansas and Arizona State recently pulled two journalism awards from Rose, citing allegations of groping and inappropriate behavior from several women.

But other schools have yet to decide the fate of similar symbolic accolades, which are often given to honor success but have increasingly been withdrawn when recipients fall from grace.

“It’s an issue that more colleges are facing now, and I think each one will look very carefully at these situations and make their own determination,” said Timothy McDonough, a vice president of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges.

Three schools — North Carolina State, New York’s Oswego State and New Jersey’s Montclair State — are all reconsidering honorary degrees given to Rose before he was fired from CBS and PBS on Nov. 21.

The final decision at North Carolina State and Oswego State will be made by their governing boards, which traditionally hold the power to confer and rescind degrees. Oswego State officials said Thursday that they have started the process to revoke Rose’s 2014 honorary degree.

“These are credible allegations of predatory sexual harassment that completely conflict with the core values of our institution and significantly degrade the achievements that were the basis for awarding him an honorary degree,” university President Deborah Stanley said.

Some others, however, are standing behind similar commendations.

The Juilliard School in New York, which gave an honorary doctorate to actor Kevin Spacey in 2000, said it does not rescind such honors. Spokeswoman Alexandra Day said the degrees are granted “based on information known about the artist at the time of the award.”

Only hours after NBC host Matt Lauer was fired on Wednesday, some alumni of Ohio University, his alma mater, were calling on officials to scrub his legacy from the school. University officials said they were “disappointed to hear of Matt Lauer’s alleged conduct” but have no policy to revoke a 1999 Medal of Merit awarded to him.

After another prominent OU alumnus, Fox News founder Roger Ailes, was accused of sexual harassment, the university decided last year to take his name off a campus newsroom and return a $500,000 gift.

Georgetown University declined to comment on an honorary degree given to Rose in 2015 but said the school has never revoked one.

McDonough, of the governing boards association, said it’s rare for schools to rescind honors but that more are likely to do so following the recent rash of allegations. At many schools, it’s a question of whether the recipient’s alleged actions come into significant conflict with the university’s ideals, he said.

Efforts to strip honors have come from students, faculty, administrators and outside critics. More than 20 schools have rescinded honorary degrees given to comedian Bill Cosby, accused by dozens of women of various kinds of sexual misconduct including assault, amid pressure from students and staff. The few that have not rescinded honors from Cosby include Temple University, his alma mater.

Student newspapers at North Carolina State and Duke University recently published editorials saying Rose should be stripped of honors from the schools. Officials at Duke, where Rose studied and received an honorary doctorate in 2016, declined to respond specifically to the Rose case but said the school has never revoked any of the hundreds of honorary degrees conferred since the 1920s.

Universities vary widely in their policies for granting honorary degrees, and even more so in their rules for revoking them. Many are given to prominent figures who speak on campus or to notable alumni. Governing boards often take recommendations from the president and discuss the matter in private sessions to avoid public scrutiny.

Marist College, a private school in New York, has faced calls to rescind a 2001 honorary degree given to alumnus and former Fox News host Bill O’Reilly over allegations of harassment, but the school has no formal policy for giving or rescinding awards. Spokeswoman Julia Fishman said the governing board recently started the process to craft one.

Robert O’Neil, a former president at the University of Virginia, said honorary degrees are supposed to honor professional achievement but often have other motivations.

“In many cases, it’s just to recognize a wealthy donor,” O’Neil told the AP. “I think the eclectic or haphazard process at some institutions risks creating a very bad precedent.”

Tax records show that some recently accused men have donated to the schools that honored them. Rose contributed at least $9,500 to Duke through his foundation between 2013 and 2015, records show, while O’Reilly gave $25,000 to Marist in that period, along with a $1 million donation to start a scholarship program.

Many universities declined to comment on honors given to embroiled men, including Clark Atlanta University, which gave an honorary doctorate to Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., in May, and the Savannah College of Art and Design, which conferred one to Lasseter in 2015.

Some schools, however, have long shunned the practice of awarding honorary degrees. The University of Virginia and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology forbid it, with policies that stem from the teachings of Thomas Jefferson, who sometimes disparaged all degrees as “meaningless credentials.”

O’Neil said other schools may need to adopt similar policies to avoid embarrassment in the future, while others will likely be more selective when choosing recipients.

“I expect that the whole process will be much tidier and much more conscientious going forward,” he said. “They don’t want to make any mistakes now.”

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Jeff Sessions: Rethink for sanctuary cities after Kate Steinle verdict

Jeff Sessions: Rethink for sanctuary cities after Kate Steinle verdict

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said that blame for Kate Steinle’s death lay at the feet of San Francisco, and he urged sanctuary cities across the country to rethink their policies in the wake of Thursday’s verdict in the trial of her illegal immigrant killer.

Jose Ines Garcia Zarate was acquitted of murder and manslaughter charges but found guilty of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Garcia Zarate had been deported five times and the federal government was seeking to deport him a sixth time when he was instead released by San Francisco authorities under their sanctuary policy restricting cooperation with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

“When jurisdictions choose to return criminal aliens to the streets rather than turning them over to federal immigration authorities, they put the public’s safety at risk,” Mr. Sessions said. “San Francisco’s decision to protect criminal aliens led to the preventable and heartbreaking death of Kate Steinle.”

He said the killing and the verdict should be a wakeup call to other sanctuaries.

“I urge the leaders of the nation’s communities to reflect on the outcome of this case and consider carefully the harm they are doing to their citizens by refusing to cooperate with federal law enforcement officers,” Mr. Sessions said.


SEE ALSO: Jose Garcia Zarate acquitted of murder in Kate Steinle shooting


He’s leading a nationwide push to withhold federal grant money from jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with ICE.

Tom Homan, the deputy director of ICE, called San Francisco’s sanctuary policy “a blatant threat to public safety.”

He vowed to have officers arrest Garcia Zapate after the California case is over, and deport him to Mexico.

“It is unconscionable that politicians across this country continue to endanger the lives of Americans with sanctuary policies while ignoring the harm inflicted on their constituents,” Mr. Homan said.

San Francisco still maintains a sanctuary policy, and has gone to court to battle Mr. Sessions.

Mr. Garcia Zapate’s lawyers on Thursday said the acquittal on all of the serious charges against their client was a stand against the Trump administration.

“Today is a vindication for the rights of immigrants,” said Francisco Ugarte.

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Roy Moore leans on abortion issue in Alabama

Roy Moore leans on abortion issue in Alabama

GADSDEN, Ala. — Given the tenor of the campaign in the state, one might think Doug Jones was a doctor performing abortions on young women, not a former prosecutor and now Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate.

But Republicans have been merciless in attacking the man some of them have dubbed “Abortion Jones,” hoping to find reasons to rally a base they fear might stay home on Election Day rather than turn out for embattled Republican nominee Roy Moore.

“I believe the people of Alabama do not understand how important this U.S. Senate race is in the future of the country, but people from outside Alabama do,” former state Sen. Scott Beason said Thursday on his radio talk show.

Mr. Beason, who in 2011 ushered through Alabama legislation banning abortion after 20 weeks, said powerful liberal organizations are focused on the race for a reason and urged his listeners to “wake up.”

Mr. Beason’s guest, Janet Porter, head of Faith2Action, a Florida-based pro-life group in Alabama to back Mr. Moore, speculated that “accusations have been ginned up” against the Republican candidate to try to steal the seat.

“The winner of this race, whoever it is, is going to be the deciding vote on who sits on the Supreme Court for the next 30 or 40 years,” she said. “That is why this race matters so much, and that is why the assault against him is so intense.”

The special election is less than two weeks away, and Mr. Moore and Mr. Jones are locked in a tight battle. After falling behind in the polls as accusations emerged of sexually predatory behavior, including against minors, Mr. Moore has retaken the lead in many polls, with voters increasingly skeptical of the women who have come forward.

He has strong support from evangelical Christian voters for whom the abortion issue is paramount.

Still, prognosticators say the race is a toss-up in a rock-red state where a Republican should be cruising to victory.

Mr. Moore has carried himself as a pro-life warrior throughout his career of public service. On the campaign trail, he has called Roe v. Wade unconstitutional and vowed to strip federal funding from Planned Parenthood.

Speaking to a congregation inside the gymnasium of a Baptist Church in Dora, Mr. Moore said “so many of our American citizens are getting killed in the womb” because they had “forsaken” God’s word and said his rival has made it clear he won’t stand for Christian values if elected.

“If your Christian culture doesn’t except abortion, same-sex marriage, sodomy, transgender rights in school bathrooms, in the military, then you are discriminatory and you will not be protected,” Mr. Moore said.

Mr. Jones is running as a moderate and staked out a more liberal position than Mr. Moore‘s, saying he supports abortion laws as they stand.

Mr. Jones‘ critics, however, have seized on his remarks, which he says he later clarified, last month on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” He said on the Sunday morning program that he is not in “favor of anything that is going to infringe on a woman’s right and her freedom to choose” and that he becomes a right-to-lifer after a child is born.

Jones takes a radical position on abortion that is out of step with even pro-choice Alabamians,” said Brett Doster, a Moore adviser. “As voters weigh his views, they realize that Jones may be better suited to represent Massachusetts or California, not Alabama.”

Democrats counter that Mr. Moore and his allies have purposely misconstrued Mr. Jones‘ stance on the issue to motivate their base.

“He supports Alabama law, which means it is the woman’s right to choose for the first trimester and the state has the right to limit the choice for the second and third trimesters,” said Richard K. Mauk, head of the Jefferson County Democratic Party in Alabama.

At the same time, Democrats recognize the potential power of the Republican line of attack. They say no single issue resonates more in Alabama than abortion.

“This is the Bible Belt, and a lot of people now believe, which they didn’t in the past, that a life begins at conception,” Mr. Mauk said. “That is what they believe, and they don’t want that life messed with, and it is a strongly held belief by a lot of folks, and they are willing to put a pedophile in office based on that.

“How do you reconcile that?” he said. “You can’t reconcile that. It is totally irrational.”

Many pro-life activists dismiss sexual misconduct accusations against Mr. Moore. They argue that a national lynch mob comprised of weak-kneed Republican leaders and liberal organizations have played up the accusations to protect the status quo and derail a candidate in the mold of President Trump.

On “The Scott Beason Show,” Mrs. Porter said a big reason she voted for Mr. Trump last year was because he promised to put pro-life judges on the Supreme Court and that electing Mr. Moore would bolster those efforts.

“What good is that promise if you don’t have a Senate that is willing to confirm them?” she said, voicing concerns about the slim Senate Republican majority, which now sits at 52-48.

Voters here also said the issue is at the top of their list of concerns.

Charles D. Jackson, 83, said he used to be a Democrat but left the party in large part because of the way it has embraced abortion. He said he could never support a candidate who was fine with it.

“Hell no, I don’t like abortion — period,” Mr. Jackson, a retired Marine, said as he strolled through the Gadsden Mall, a location where, according to some of his opponents, Mr. Moore sought out teens to date as a prosecutor in his 30s.

Just outside the building, a woman puffing a cigarette who declined to share her name over concerns related to her job, said she has known for a long time that some of the accusations against Mr. Moore were true but she was still wrestling with the question of whether she would vote for him.

Asked whether an issue like abortion could swing her, she said she would listen to “my gut.”

The heavy national attention also appears to be weighing on Alabama residents.

A man sporting an Atlanta Braves baseball cap sitting in a rocking chair at the mall said he had been following the race but had no interest discussing it with The Washington Times.

“You ought to go home,” he said.

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Trump blasts verdict after undocumented man acquitted in pier shooting

Trump blasts verdict after undocumented man acquitted in pier shooting

President Donald Trump lashed out Thursday night at a not guilty ruling in a murder trial he had used to argue against illegal immigration.

Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, an undocumented immigrant, was found not guilty of first-degree murder, second-degree murder and manslaughter. He was convicted on a lesser charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Garcia Zarate admitted to picking up a gun on a San Francisco pier in 2015, and said it accidentally went off striking and killing 32-year-old Kate Steinle, according to The Associated Press. The prosecution argued he carelessly handled the weapon, which the Bureau of Land Management said previously was stolen from an agent’s vehicle.

Trump repeatedly referred to the shooting on the campaign trail in 2015 and 2016 as an argument for building a border wall between the United States and Mexico and becoming tougher on illegal immigration. Garcia Zarate had been deported to his native Mexico previously multiple times and had just gotten out of jail after a drug charge was dismissed.

San Francisco is a so-called sanctuary city and does not notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) when an undocumented immigrant is detained.

The president took to Twitter shortly after the Thursday verdict to condemn the ruling.

He followed that up eight hours later with two more tweets calling the jury decision a “complete travesty of justice” and blaming policy of his predecessor Barack Obama, as well as Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer and and Rep. Nancy Pelosi.

Trump’s condemnation of the shooting goes back to the beginning of his campaign.

“This man, or this animal, that shot that wonderful, that beautiful woman in San Francisco, this guy was pushed back by Mexico,” Trump told CNN’s Anderson Cooper in an interview in July 2015, just a month after bringing up Mexican undocumented immigrants in his candidacy announcement. “Mexico pushes back people across the border that are criminals, that are drug dealers.”

Criticism came from both sides of the aisle, however. Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., whose district includes parts of the Bay Area, also condemned the ruling.

Steinle’s family told The San Francisco Chronicle that they were “saddened and shocked” by the verdict.

“There’s no other way you can coin it,” said Steinle’s father, James Steinle. “Justice was rendered, but it was not served.”

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Trump blasts verdict after undocumented man acquitted in pier shooting

Trump blasts verdict after undocumented man acquitted in pier shooting

President Donald Trump lashed out Thursday night at a not guilty ruling in a murder trial he had used to argue against illegal immigration.

Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, an undocumented immigrant, was found not guilty of first-degree murder, second-degree murder and manslaughter. He was convicted on a lesser charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Garcia Zarate admitted to picking up a gun on a San Francisco pier in 2015, and said it accidentally went off striking and killing 32-year-old Kate Steinle, according to The Associated Press. The prosecution argued he carelessly handled the weapon, which the Bureau of Land Management said previously was stolen from an agent’s vehicle.

Trump repeatedly referred to the shooting on the campaign trail in 2015 and 2016 as an argument for building a border wall between the United States and Mexico and becoming tougher on illegal immigration. Garcia Zarate had been deported to his native Mexico previously multiple times and had just gotten out of jail after a drug charge was dismissed.

San Francisco is a so-called sanctuary city and does not notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) when an undocumented immigrant is detained.

The president took to Twitter shortly after the Thursday verdict to condemn the ruling.

He followed that up eight hours later with two more tweets calling the jury decision a “complete travesty of justice” and blaming policy of his predecessor Barack Obama, as well as Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer and and Rep. Nancy Pelosi.

Trump’s condemnation of the shooting goes back to the beginning of his campaign.

“This man, or this animal, that shot that wonderful, that beautiful woman in San Francisco, this guy was pushed back by Mexico,” Trump told CNN’s Anderson Cooper in an interview in July 2015, just a month after bringing up Mexican undocumented immigrants in his candidacy announcement. “Mexico pushes back people across the border that are criminals, that are drug dealers.”

Criticism came from both sides of the aisle, however. Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., whose district includes parts of the Bay Area, also condemned the ruling.

Steinle’s family told The San Francisco Chronicle that they were “saddened and shocked” by the verdict.

“There’s no other way you can coin it,” said Steinle’s father, James Steinle. “Justice was rendered, but it was not served.”

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Report finds law enforcement failed at Charlottesville rally

Report finds law enforcement failed at Charlottesville rally

Law enforcement’s response to a violent white nationalist rally in Virginia last summer failed on multiple fronts, leading to “deep distrust of government” in the Charlottesville community, an independent review released Friday found.

Former U.S. Attorney Tim Heaphy’s monthslong investigation of the Charlottesville rally found that the city failed by not adequately communicating or coordinating in advance and by removing an officer from an area where a car plowed into counterprotesters and killed a woman.

Heaphy’s team interviewed 150 people and pored over half a million documents for the report, which found a lack of preparation and coordination between state and city police and a passive response by officers to the chaos.

“This represents a failure of one of government’s core functions—the protection of fundamental rights,” the report said. “Law enforcement also failed to maintain order and protect citizens from harm, injury, and death. Charlottesville preserved neither of those principles on Aug. 12, which has led to deep distrust of government within this community.”

White nationalists who descended on Charlottesville in part to protest plans to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee began fighting in the streets with counterdemonstrators before the event even officially began. The brawling went on for nearly an hour in front of officers until the event eventually disbanded. Later, as counterdemonstrators were peacefully marching through a downtown street, a car drove into the crowd, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring many more.

The report says “planning and coordination breakdowns” before Aug. 12 led to “disastrous results.”

“Because of their misalignment and lack of accessible protective gear, officers failed to intervene in physical altercations that took place in areas adjacent to Emancipation Park,” the report said.

State police directed their officers “to remain behind barricades rather than risk injury responding to conflicts between protesters and counter-protesters,” it said. And Charlottesville commanders “similarly instructed their officers not to intervene in all but the most serious physical confrontations.”

State police and Charlottesville police were unable to communicate by radio the day of the rally because they were on different channels, the report said.

The review also found that an officer was initially supposed to be stationed near the intersection where the car plowed into counterprotesters. But the officer asked for relief out of safety concerns and was not replaced.

Only a sawhorse was in place when the car drove into the crowd, killing Heyer and injuring at least 19 others. The day’s death toll rose to three when two state troopers sent to monitor the scene and support the governor’s motorcade died in a helicopter crash.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Police Chief Al Thomas and other top officials have previously defended the law enforcement response, saying police had to show restraint because some people in the crowd were heavily armed.

Rally organizers and counterprotesters, as well as some law enforcement experts, have questioned why authorities didn’t do more to separate opposing forces or step in once the violence began breaking out.

City officials had tried to move the rally to a larger park about a mile (1.5 kilometers) from downtown Charlottesville, but their request was blocked by a federal judge after the American Civil Liberties Union sued on free-speech grounds.

Heaphy makes a series of recommendations, including suggesting that the General Assembly empower cities to enact “reasonable restrictions” on the right to carry guns at large protests.

Other recommendations include:

— Police should make sure that conflicting groups are kept away from each other.

— Police should respond immediately to any violence.

— Charlottesville police should find better ways to gather intelligence on protest groups and use that information in their operational plans for protests.

— Charlottesville police need to do a better job engaging with citizens, business and community groups who are “divided” over the events of the summer.

Heaphy served as the U.S. attorney in Virginia from 2009-2015, after being appointed by President Barack Obama.

The Republican Party of Virginia criticized the city’s decision to hire Heaphy, arguing he should be disqualified because of past political donations he made to Democratic candidates, including $200 to Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer’s campaign fund in 2015.

Heaphy has said his contributions would have no bearing on the review.

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Clues that may lead to capture of missing teen, soccer coach

Clues that may lead to capture of missing teen, soccer coach

It’s been days since a 17-year-old Florida girl and a 27-year-old soccer coach from her high school went missing together. Caught on surveillance cameras in multiple states, experts are now weighing in on the case and explaining how these clues may lead to their capture.

Caitlyn Frisina was last seen at her home Saturday night, and her parents reported her missing Sunday, authorities said. The teen’s phone — which had been completely erased — was left behind, authorities said. It’s believed she left voluntarily with Rian Rodriguez, 27, a family friend and Frisina’s father’s assistant soccer coach at the high school, authorities said.

Frisina and Rodriguez were spotted on cameras in Georgia on Sunday and then at a pawn shop in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

Lenny Depaul, a former chief inspector with the U.S. Marshals Service, said on “Good Morning America” today, “One of the video cameras picked up surveillance on their vehicle — they’re still in that red car — which is a home run for law enforcement. That Florida plate, hopefully they get some LPRs — license plate readers — picking up that plate on the highways.”

Depaul also said a key for investigators is likely their “tight circle of friends.”

“They’re traveling, they gotta be communicating somehow,” he said of the teen and coach. “Somebody’s got a device.”

ABC News chief legal analyst Dan Abrams added, “They’re going to need money. … Either people are going to help them, which means you’ve got more potential witnesses, or they’re going to have to try and get money, which will lead to more possible evidence to find them.”

The two are believed to be headed north, Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter said Wednesday. Frisina has family in New York and Rodriguez has family in Canada and possibly Pennsylvania, Murray Smith, public information officer for the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, said Tuesday.

As for the potential consequences, Abrams said, “Authorities have been very careful not to say he’s being charged with a crime. Why? They want him to turn himself in. … Because as of right now, we don’t know if there was a physical relationship between them.”

Authorities said it appeared “a potential relationship” was blossoming between Frisina and Rodriguez.

Although authorities say the teen left voluntarily, “if there was [a physical relationship between Frisina and Rodriguez,] that would be a crime in the state of Florida based on their ages,” Abrams said. “Age of consent in Florida is 18. There are exceptions if you’re under the age of 24, which he’s not.”

As the teen and adult “go state to state, he also may be committing crimes in each of those states depending on what the state laws are as well,” Abrams said.

He went on, “The fact that he’s the coach at the school poses all sorts of additional moral and legal problems for him and the school.”

Rodriguez has been working as a boys’ soccer coach at Fort White High School, but has been suspended pending the investigation, according to a statement from Lex Carswell, superintendent of Columbia County Schools.

Frisina has played soccer at Fort White High School, according to an online roster published by Next College Student Athlete.

Rodriguez and the teen had been around each other “at sports events, but they’ve never been alone at all,” Smith said.

As the search intensifies, Depaul said, “We know one thing for sure — Caitlyn and Rian are still together.”

Abrams added, “I’m confident that they’re going to find them pretty quickly.”

Frisina is described as having brown hair and brown eyes. She is 5 foot 7 inches tall and weighs 135 pounds, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said.

Rodriguez is described as having black hair and brown eyes. He’s 5 foot 10 inches tall and weighs 220 pounds, the agency said.

They may be traveling north in a 2001 red Mercury Sable with Florida tag Z04CSC, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said.

The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office has asked anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the authorities at (386) 719-2005.

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Slow-moving storm set to slam Northwest with heavy snow, rain

Slow-moving storm set to slam Northwest with heavy snow, rain

A large, slow-moving storm system will send waves of moisture into Washington, Oregon and northern California through the weekend, producing gusty winds, heavy snow in the mountains and rain along the coast and lower elevations.

Up to another foot of snow fell in parts of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest over the last 48 hours and more is on the way.

The storm system is slowly moving east Friday morning, with rain and snow already spreading into Washington state.

The actual storm — with gusty winds, snow and rain — will move into the Northwest on Saturday morning and will last through the afternoon.

The storm will continue to move inland, bringing heavy snow to the Rockies on Sunday from Montana to Utah and Colorado. The total weekend snowfall is expected to be measured in feet, and some areas from the Cascades into the Rockies could see several feet of snow by Sunday night.

Rain will fall in coastal areas of Washington and Oregon, with some areas seeing up to 3 inches.

Dec. 1 is the first day of meteorological winter, but it will not feel like winter in most of the country with cities from Denver to New York City seeing highs in the 50s. Chicago will be in the 50s Friday, its warmest start to meteorological winter in five years!

But all of this warm weather will end next week, starting in Midwest early in the week and then the Northeast by the end of the week. Several waves of arctic air will move into the lower 48 states from the Dakotas into the Carolinas.

The cold blast reaches the Midwest and the Great Lakes on Monday and Tuesday, and then moves into the Northeast on Wednesday afternoon into Thursday and Friday.

A second shot of arctic air will move into the Midwest and the Great Lakes the following weekend.

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